Computer-Music.com contains articles and product reviews related to making music using computers and creating 3D computer animation in sync with music. Computer-Music.com is also the home page of  Donald S. Griffin, an experienced professional composer, sound effects designer and audio consultant with an emphasis on computer games,  video games and internet music and sound effects. For pricing and contract availability send email to: DGriffin (@) Computer-Music (.) com

Computer-Music.com  contains articles and product reviews related to making music using computers and creating 3D computer animation in sync with music.
Computer-Music.com is also the home page of  Donald S. Griffin, an experienced professional composer, sound effects designer and audio consultant with an emphasis on computer games,  video games and internet music and sound effects. For pricing and contract availability send email to: DGriffin (@) Computer-Music (.) com



 

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Introduction

Composing music is an art form that dates back hundreds or even thousands of years. Yet only in the last part of this century have composers had to deal with substantially different instruments, and computers have only come into widespread use in the last ten to twenty years. Not only is the rate of change in music keeping step with changes in technology, one could even argue that music is changing so fast that technology can barely keep up. I know several composers, including myself, who often run into situations where they are ready to do something for which the tools have not yet been invented. Many times in this situation, they make the tools themselves. Later, when the tools are finally being designed they already know what works and are able to tell the tool designers what they need most.

Change at this pace can often overwhelm a composer, leaving little time for inspiration. The newfound flexibility that computer music affords also can be confusing. Composing can turn into an unfamiliar process, even though there are still only twelve notes (in most cases.)

My life in music has been one of change after change. It happens so fast and so often that I am reticent to declare with any conviction that there is a right or wrong way to drag inspiration, kicking and screaming, from a mass of new age confusion. I do feel comfortable explaining how I personally have overcome many cases of ‘blank page syndrome’ and been happy with the results. The approaches I use are best thought of as a combination of mental preparedness followed by technical trickery. The goal of this article is not so much to show right from wrong as to lead by example. Hopefully by following my thought process you can adapt some of my methods to your own unique situation. Keep in mind that although most of these suggestions may be used like aspirin ("only as needed"), other methods are good precautions against writers’ block that I recommend using all the time.

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